ModMagCanadian Magazines: Past, Present, Future—presented by the Modern Magazines Project Canada and supported in part by Eighteen Bridges magazine and the Alberta Magazine Publishers Association—features talks, readings, and displays highlighting the past, present, and future of magazine publishing in Canada.

Modern Magazines Project Canada is a collaborative initiative that brings together scholars, magazine professionals, and digitization specialists with the goal of building an international and interdisciplinary network for the study and promotion of periodicals. The project—beginning with the invite-only “Magazines and/as Media” workshop, followed by the “Canadian Magazines: Past, Present, Future” public symposium—will build toward long-term partnerships and collaborations focused on magazines and the digital turn.

While the other project related events are by invitation only, this event is open to the public and will feature talks, readings, and displays highlighting the past, present, and future of magazine publishing in Canada.

Alumni House, University of Alberta (11515 Saskatchewan Drive)
Saturday, August 16, 7-9pm
Refreshments and cash bar.

The Modern Magazines Project Canada is organized by Hannah McGregor, postdoctoral fellow in the University of Alberta’s Department of English and Film Studies; Faye Hammill, Professor of English at the University of Strathclyde; and Paul Hjartarson, Professor Emeritus in the Department of English and Film Studies at the University of Alberta.

About the Project Organizers

Hannah McGregor is a SSHRC-funded postdoctoral fellow in the University of Alberta’s Department of English and Film Studies. Her areas of research include periodical studies, middlebrow culture, contemporary and early twentieth-century Canadian literature, the ethics of representation, critical race studies, and media studies.

Faye Hammill is Professor of English at the University of Strathclyde, where her  main areas of expertise are Canadian studies, early-twentieth-century literature, middlebrow culture, and periodicals. She also leads the AHRC Middlebrow Network and is Principal Investigator for Magazines, Travel and Middlebrow Culture in Canada 1925-1960.

Paul Hjartarson, Professor Emeritus in the Department of English and Film Studies at the University of Alberta, teaches and researches primarily in the area of twentieth-century Canadian literature, print culture and the digital humanities. He is Director of the Editing Modernism in Canada research group at the University of Alberta (EMiC UA) and Project Leader of the Editing Wilfred Watson Archive Project. He is currently completing a study of how the Cold War shaped the post-war Canadian literary institution. With Shirley Neuman he is editing the letters Sheila and Wilfred Watson wrote one another between 1956 and 1961.

Full details about the project, participants and events are online at http://modmag.ca.