SOS Children's Safety Magazine EdmontonThe Edmonton-based SOS Children’s Safety Magazine is recognized as a viable resource for preventative educational material in Canada. The publication was founded in 2002 and has grown substantially over the last nine years in readership and circulation. By providing new innovative design and relevant content through hard copy and online presence, the magazine has attracted a captivated audience across the nation. Last year in 2010 they distributed over 260,000 copies of the publication and received honourable mention from the country’s top political leaders, law enforcement agencies, and educational faculties. Topics include teaching children and parents alike about bullying, peer pressure, the huge crystal meth epidemic, teen suicide and much more.

 

This level of awareness has enabled them to go above and beyond the boundaries of their pages by opening new doors for overcoming challenging issues faced by teens on a day to day basis. Through school counselling presentations, in partnership with non-profit organizations such as Saffron, and their scholarship “The Joshua Hunt Safety Award” SOS Magazine has not only created a vehicle for teens to source out answers and solutions, but also given financial support to further their post secondary education.

The magazine is distributed free of charge where parents, children and educators can have access to it — through Doctor’s offices, schools, police stations, childcare facilities, as well as many high traffic retail areas. It has been recommended by law enforcement officers and educators across Canada. The magazine is supported entirely through advertising.

In the last 9 years, the magazine has gone from a small Edmonton circulated publication to reaching children across Canada from British Columbia to Newfoundland.  From schools to police stations and hospitals to day care centers, SOS is distributed free of charge to all readers young and old.

Their online presence has similarly expanded and improved over the years. In addition to their main website, www.soskids.ca, their sister website www.soskidsonline.ca includes articles not in the printed magazine such as on drug abuse, bullying and teen violence, internet and technology, relationships and dating and articles of keen interest to teens. The articles are designed for mobile viewing on smartphones and tablets.